Paige Walker Photography is a photo studio based in Fort Worth that specializes in newborn and twin newborn portraits. The business also shoots child, maternity, family, and senior portraits. The photo studio has a large variety of props and backgrounds to choose from, and Paige Walker's easy going personality keeps newborns calm. Clients have praised the photographer for her ability to make subjects feel comfortable and her beautiful photos.
Autumn Reynolds Photography is a portrait photographer Lewisville, specializing in naturally lit photographs that evoke simplicity and timelessness. Owner Autumn Reynolds offers services ranging from newborn and birth to maternity sessions, and is also well-versed in family, children, and seniors photography. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of North Texas and is a member of the Professional Photographers of America.
Zam Photography provides photography services for (weddings, seniors, family, children, fashion, and events). Zam Photography serves the Houston area. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides wedding photography photographs. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides Newborn photography and specializes in newborn posed photography. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides children photography. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides family photography. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides engagement and couples photography. Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides senior photography sessions.  Zam Photography of Kingwood, Texas provides fashion photography sessions. Zam Photography provides photography in Kingwood and the greater Houston area.Even if it’s a few emails, a phone call, or an in person meeting at a coffee shop, have a consultation with the family at some point before the shoot. Address things like what the family will wear (use a service like Pinterest to create a board for the family to look at for suggestions on how they might dress), what time of day would be the best for them, and what they’re looking to get out of the shoot (i.e., candids, headshots, or a holiday card).
The light meter in your camera is a fool. Actually, they are pretty damn clever but they get tricked by large areas of white and black. For example, the camera will compensate for a large area of the photo being white (the wedding dress). You set your exposure bang in the middle of the light meter and the photo is really dark. That’s because the white dress is tricking your camera. Dialling, in a bit of positive exposure compensation here, can sort this problem out. But don’t go too far and blow the highlights as they are harder to recover in post-production than shadows. What we like to do is just check on the LCD screen and keep monitoring it to achieve an accurate exposure.
There are a few bonuses to using accessories well (as well as layers). One is that changing them up a bit throughout the session can give you multiple looks without having to do many wardrobe changes. They can also be something that the subjects can interact with. A sassy little tip of the hat, holding the ends of a scarf while running and letting it billow behind you, grabbing the lapels of a husbands jacket while pulling him close for a kiss – all these little gestures and ways to interact (and become more comfortable in front of the camera) can be made possible with styling choices. Many of my sessions will feature items used outside their intended use or subject. My girls are often seen in mommy’s hats or scarves (scarves can be used in different ways like wrapped around their shoulders, as a hair piece, etc) and they love to wear my costume jewelry.
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